• Bhutan Heron Travels
  • Bhutan Heron Travels
  • Bhutan Heron Travels
  • Bhutan Heron Travels
  • Bhutan Heron Travels

How to Reach Bhutan ?

Current News in Bhutan

Kuensel : BBS : Bhutan Times : Bhutan Observer

 

People and Culture PDF Print E-mail

Bhutan’s population is currently estimated at approximately 7,50,000, the majority of whom practice the Vajrayana form of Mahayana Buddhism. Buddhists believe in universal respect for all forms of life and the importance of protecting nature in all its manifestations. This belief is deeply embedded in Bhutanese society and culture. While Buddhism teaches preservation and prohibits killing, Bon inculcates a deep respect for the environment and the belief that all natural phenomena – mountains, rivers, lakes, rocks and the Earth itself – are imbued with powerful spirits that can influence the general well being of a village, community or society. According to traditional beliefs, to disturb and pollute these aspects of the natural world are to incur punishments from the deities ranging from disease to death. Consequently, the Bhutanese have always treasured the natural environment and looked upon it as a source of all life.

The country’s population is composed of three main ethnic groups. The Sharchopas, who are considered to be the earliest inhabitants of Bhutan, live mostly in Eastern Bhutan and are of Indo-Mongoloid origin. The Ngalops populate mostly Western Bhutan and migrated from the Tibetan plains and are the importers of Buddhism to Bhutan. The Lhotsampas who are of Nepalese origin settled in the southern foothills of the country in the early twentieth century. This ethnic diversity has resulted in numerous dialects and languages that are spoken throughout the country. Dzongkha is the National language. English is the medium of instruction in schools and is widely spoken.

 
We have 48 guests online
Bhutan Web Designer